Millennials are Killing


#1

Every day I see these headlines, “Millennials are killing” this or that. Just a few days ago I learned that Millennials “endanger” casual dining restaurants like Buffalo Wild Wings and Applebee’s…

Now it seems we’re “killing” dozens of industries!

I don’t want anyone to lose their jobs, but I’ve never been a fan of corporate, “casual dining” style restaurant chains. I’d rather eat at some mom & pop joint that has some authenticity than pay for the “atmosphere” in a place like TGI Friday’s. I think that may be part of it, but the bigger issue is that Millennials are POOR! It’s not just that we have different values than our parents, a lot of my friends couldn’t afford to go to these restaurants even if they wanted to, or they only go for special occasions like birthdays or graduations.

I thought the second article I linked did a pretty good job breaking down this issue. Any thoughts on the “dozens of industries” we’re killing off by being frugal, cooking, drinking, and entertaining ourselves at home?


#2

I just saw both of those on Twitter today!

I don’t have anything against casual dining but those are not casual dining places to me. They’re chains. Besides the miracle that is In n Out - I don’t really care for chains like Black Angus or Applebee’s. There’s like 5 of them in one city and they all serve the same thing and taste pretty much the same. That’s pretty boring and they’re not usually cheap eats. It’s all meh food for a high price.

If I’m going out I’m not hankering for American. A lot of millennials like me go out for Japanese, Korean, Greek etc. My favorite is Ethiopian food - in fact I’m probably the only Chinese girl who knows how to make decent Ethiopian food around here hahaha.

But yeah, kids like us just prefer more exotic fare than our parents. My hubby’s parents goes to Denny’s & another local diner where they have country fried steak, jalapeno poppers, waffles etc. Good standard American fares. They don’t eat Korean or Ethiopian food because that’s just not what they’re used to.

And the retail thing (Sears and Kmart) OK that’s not OUR fault. It’s just dumb to hold everything in a huge store when it can be store somewhere cheaper (cough cough, warehouses) and be shipped to you. How many millennials are living car free? I know if I didn’t have Amazon…man I don’t know. I’d be rolling around in my underpants scared for my next meal.

I actually like the second article, it’s true. Millennials are definitely scarred from their experience. All I remember as an 18 year old was 1. recession 2. budget cuts 3. student loans. I didn’t even understand the whole housing bubble thing except that it was the bank’s fault and then they were bailed out etc. Not a great introduction to adulthood.


#3

I can make microwaved food too…


#4

This was my exact thought on the restaurant article. If you want me to pay $4 for cheese fries, then do more than microwave a kraft single over some frozen bagged fries.


#5

It’s their own fault.

Local pubs and breweries are giving people what they want. Local, delicious beer and often locally sourced food. One of my local breweries frequently has food trucks and another often has live music.

These shitty chain restaurants have stuck with their OG business models for too long and now they’re hurting. Their food is processed, microwaved or deep fried crap. They can change or they can die.

Sorry not sorry.


#6

I don’t think it has anything to do with said millennials. But with the consumer behavior that is starting to shift as a whole, as it does every new generation grows larger. It’s just a quick marketing trick to reach a bigger audience. Everything with the word millennial in it seem to get picked up big time.

Business are always being defined by their customers. As they change over the years and even centuries but the business don’t follow along… Than you get this kind of stories.

As @wereallpoorhere says: “It’s their own fault”, they just can’t admit it.

Just my 2 cents.


#7

It’s all bland food. I can make better food at home for a lot less money. We’re not killing chain restaurants. What was a good dining experience for previous generations doesn’t necessarily work for Millennials.


#8

It’s called “the market” for a reason. Things change. Businesses (to include restaurants) who don’t change with the times and adjust to market conditions are doomed to fail. Millennials aren’t to blame. Businesses that refuse to adjust are. Good workers will always be able to find work elsewhere.


#9

I agree, and both articles are written without relavent data and are pure speculation.


#10

The first thing I thought you meant when I read this title is that ‘Millennials are Killing…Life’ as in, the slang killing it for doing great. :raised_hands:

Damn millennial mind making me think the media actually wrote something good about us for once haha :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

I have been seeing these articles blaming millennials for various businesses failing. I am not a millennial since I am 44, but had to chime in and defend you guys for once. Sears… When I was young, I spent hours and hours looking over the Sears (and J.C. Penny) catalogs looking for what I wanted for Christmas. This was back when Craftsman/Kenmore were actually high quality products that they stood behind. Instead of transitioning their catalog into the internet and keeping their Craftsman/Kenmore lines high quality…they did neither of these things and they are failing miserably as a result.


#12

I grew up with jcp clothes and my dad only used Craftsman tools. Last time I was in a jcp they had the same tired 90s store with 90s styles :-/

Even my dad stopped buying Craftsman. These businesses have been going down hill since I was in highschool. Are they mad Millennials didn’t save them?


#13

Also does anyone remember Kmart? Rofl


#14

Millennials are getting blamed for so much these days. I guess it’s easier for companies than looking in the mirror and thinking “hmmm, maybe our business model isn’t working anymore”.


#15

How about we re-frame it to “millennial’s are accelerating the beautiful creative destruction of capitalism”.

:slight_smile:


#16

Ohhhh yeah I’d retweet that quote :ok_hand:


#17

I second everybody. Poor quality food in meh atmospheres at high prices are what’s killing chain restaurants. I won’t even go to them, and I’m older than a millennial. They are just gross. Either change with the times or realize you don’t have a future. Shifts in consumer trends are “killing” brick and mortar retail. When the whole world buys things online and your only options are go to a mall and a store or “pick up in store” ain’t nobody got time for that. We’re trying to change the world, not spend gas, time, energy, and more money for household items that can be purchase online (with thousands more options) and shipped right to our door. My usual motto is, if I can’t get it online, I’m probably not going to get it. The world is different than it was 30 years ago, and businesses either need to change or close. That’s capitalism. It’s not millenials’ or anyone else’s job to keep failing businesses in business. Well maybe besides the CEO :joy:

And I agree. Throwing the words "millenial"
And “killing” in the same title just smells of click bait.


#18

Pretty much sums it up. Sensory overload to make people feel like they’re having fun is pretty much all these places offer. Sure, restaurants frequented by Millennials do that too, but they offer additional things like healthy options, live music, locally sources food, etc. You adapt as a business or die, and that doesn’t mean a whole industry is gone - it just means it’s evolving.


#19

Would work, except the fact that any damage Millennials do to traditional chain restaurants is precisely because they are partaking in a capitalist exercise :slight_smile:


#20

If you read Buffalo Wild Wing’s shareholder letter, the CEO acknowledges the need for change. BUT doesn’t want to spend too much money on it. Doesn’t sound like 100% commitment to me.