Frugal living spreading through the world


#1

Hi everyone,

As a bit of backstory, Australia has a massive debt problem. Especially if you live in Sydney or Melbourne, which are incredibly expensive places to live. The average debt is 187% of our yearly salaries. Yikes.

I’ve been lucky to be reading blogs and forums like this one for almost a year now. But I can’t talk to anyone in my friend or family circles about it, because none of them understand or want to bother with budgeting, frugal living, investing etc. So, I was highly surprised when I found this article today, because no one here is talking about it. Hopefully this is the start of a change!


#2

I’ve been to both Sydney and Melbourne and it definitely is expensive! I’m from Chicago and now live in Milwaukee. It is great, because we have all the amenities of a big city, but with a much cheaper cost of living and Chicago is only an hour or so away by train and car. I definitely think being frugal with the small things helps, but in my opinion, it is the big things like housing and cars that really make a difference in financial independence.


#3

I think Americans are even worse at money. While there does seem to be a frugal/FIRE movement going on, it is barely moving the needle on changing human nature in regards to spending.


#4

As a whole maybe, but my last stay in South Yara Melbourne reminded me more of New York City spending excess. And that was only two years out from the recession. My neighbor in my work paid furnished apartment drove a new Ferrari and lived in their apartment for two straight years. It was a two hundred dollars a day sort of place…


#5

That’s interesting. Hopefully this community, small thought it may be, will continue spreading now that a bit more attention is coming towards it.


#6

That’s true, a lot of people here still go way above and beyond what they need. Australia was pretty lucky because the GFC barely hit us, we had a massive budget surplus and China kept buying all of our mining goods. Our recession is looming in the next couple of years according to many analysts.


#7

Interesting! I’ve been reading a lot about the situation in Japan, where younger generations have become frugal and people are acting like it’s the end of the world

But I’m all for frugal living! As Edward Abbey said, “Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.”


#8

First of all, I love that saying! Second, a new article came out this morning talking about frugality and how bad it would be for our economy if we all lived like that. Japan might not be the only place that has a “problem” now :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

Do you have a link to that article? I’d love to see it! I always liked MMM’s take on this http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/04/09/what-if-everyone-became-frugal/


#10

Yeah mate, here’s the article! It’s a fair way off what MMM predicts will happen.


#11

I feel what you’re saying @HernandezPrime but let it be like water off a ducks back.
We don’t need consumerism, but it needs us…
When others are crying poor, you will be living rich!
Living the Dream!
Peter


#12

This is part of an overall trend that has been developing for close to 40 years in america. People are not savings due to the fact their incomes are not growing and emergencies crop up like car repairs or medical bills.I am fortunate that my wife is extremely well paid so we have saved lots of money over the past 30 years. The Midwest is a cheap place to live with regard to housing but salaries tend to be lower. Of course many new college graduates are also being hit with huge amounts of student loan debt. Something has to change. Maybe they need to start teaching personal finance in high school.


#13

I think the article still backs up what you are saying - no-one is really talking about it here. The first two examples are a journalist in the UK, and the Frugalwoods. An Australian is mentioned third, and then the final link is to someone who wrote a book over 10 years ago!

As you said, though, hopefully it will be the start of a change. All we can do is keep blogging and build up a big enough network to begin getting noticed.


#14

I agree totally!! It’s a life skill that would benefit many, many children and could potentially cause worldwide changes to how our economy works, hopefully for the better. This idea that more is better has caused its fair share of issues.


#15

Well pointed out!


#16

I think as the journalist says at the end of their article “its an experience movement vs mindless consumption”.
Anchoring this as a frugal movement is a bit of a passive aggressive response to “keeping up with the Jonses”.
As in life opinions, agendas and emotions most often lead and justify our choices.
If you really want to be free, discover how much is your enough, turn off the financial pornography, and do the activities that give you a direct benefit return on your time investment.
You will be amazed at how rich life really is!
Living the Dream
Peter


#17

From the Onion… lol